How China used technology to fight the coronavirus crisis

How China used technology to fight the coronavirus crisis

Staff Writer
Staff Writer
Pinduoduo Content Team
March 25, 2020

Technology played a big role in China’s fight against the coronavirus pandemic. From the use of drones to detect feverish pedestrians to virtual classrooms for homebound students, China has employed tech to both enforce social distancing and quarantines and at the same time make the lockdowns more bearable.

Here are some examples of how China deployed technology to help combat COVID-19:

  • Robots were used in many areas to reduce human-to-human contact. In some restaurants, robots brought food from kitchens to delivery workers. They were deployed to send meals to those in isolation at hotels. Robots were also used to spray disinfectants in hospitals and public areas.
Image for post
Source: Handout
  • Drones were fitted with thermal cameras for aerial detection of fever among the population, and authorities used thermal goggles to identify people who had elevated body temperatures.
Image for post
Source: Xinhua News
  • Unmanned aerial vehicles were also used for surveillance to detect large crowds, with command centers monitoring the feeds in real time.
  • China offered free access to its Tianhe-1 supercomputer, which can go through hundreds of images generated by computed tomography (CT) and give a diagnosis of COVID-19 in about 10 seconds.
Image for post
Source:Xinhua News
  • E-commerce platforms educated merchants and farmers on how to sell their products online. Pinduoduo, for example, helped more than 67,000 farmers, including many from impoverished areas, sell their agricultural produce online. Some even learned how to livestream so they could explain their products to those locked down at home.
Image for post
Source: Handout
  • More than 220 million smartphone app downloads happened in China via the Apple store in the first week of February, according to data by analytics provider App Annie.
  • Remote collaboration tools like DingTalk, Lark, Zoom and WeChat Work were downloaded as companies asked employees to work from home. (Zoom, an American videoconferencing app, jumped from №180 in late January to №28 as of late February in China, according to App Annie.)
  • Online classrooms for children were supported by more than 7,000 servers so 50 million elementary and middle school students could study at the same time.

Sources: CNN, TechCrunch, Pinduoduo, CNBC, Financial Times, Washington Post, South China Morning Post

POSTED IN:
POSTED IN:
No items found.